35% OFF Any Course

FREE

Webinar with Dr. Cobb

Brain-Based Fall Prevention & Preparation.

Purchase includes an invitation to a Q&A July 23rd

New Course! Headache: The Brain-Based Practitioner's Guide Course

Sale $399!

$599

Sale Ends July 31st

July 29th
Free Masterclass

Pain & Performance: 8 Keys to Elite Brain-Based Training

Up to 40% OFF Certification Courses - Ends March 21st

The Mastery in Motion Sale!

Video Highlights

- Respiration and resistance context.
- Clear drill instructions & examples.
- Training protocol.

Lung Strength & Function


Today, I’m going to cover a very fast, no pun intended, fast exhalation exercise.

Lung Strength & Function – Getting Some Context

Usually when we are working on improving respiratory muscular strength we use devices like this, which is an inspiratory and expiratory muscle training device meaning it has resistance.

The Breathing Gym is our newest at-home training product. It is designed to teach you how to build your own personal breathing program for endurance, optimal performance, and a better brain!

However, there is some excellent research out that indicates that if we do nothing more than just focus on a fast exhalation we can improve oblique activity, transversus activity and we can also improve lung function just by focusing on non-resisted fast exhalation.

Here’s how you do it.

Lung Strength & Function – Correct & Incorrect Method

You’re going to buy a very, very cheap, very inexpensive spirometer. This will cost you 15 or 20 bucks on Amazon and is a fantastic training tool.

If you have asthma, you probably are used to using one of these, but these are invaluable for working on improving respiratory function.

Here’s how the exercise is done. After you have your spirometer, you’re going to stand there. You’re going to take a very full breath in deep – as deep as you can. And then you are going to do a very sharp, fast exhalation with the focus being on the instantaneous intensity of the exhale.

We’re not trying to empty our lungs.

So I’m going to demonstrate it correctly and incorrectly.

Lung Strengthening: Female athlete bent over catching her breath.

Alright, so first full breath in and a super fast, super hard exhalation.

All right. Now you get a measurement on your spirometer not a big deal right now unless you’re tracking it for a specific reason.

The other way that people often do this, which does not seem to be as effective, is to work on exhaling all of their air.

So this is the incorrect version.

Both can have some effect but in terms of looking at the literature what we’re seeing is the first version – the fast instantaneous hard contraction to get the air out is more effective.

Lung Strength & Function – How Much To Do?

The way that we were going to do this is you are going to do 20 breaths and you’re going to do that in three minutes.

That’s because we don’t want this to feel horrible.

It doesn’t have to be super fast or super intense.

The Breathing Gym is our newest at-home training product. It is designed to teach you how to build your own personal breathing program for endurance, optimal performance, and a better brain!

So you set your timer for three minutes.

You do 20 sharp, fast, instantaneous exhalations after a full inhale.

If you do that, based on the research study that we’ve been looking at, you’re looking at doing that three times a week for four weeks.

That particular regimen – very easy – is literally going to take you whatever that is.

Nine minutes per week.

It’s shown some quite profound effects on improving respiratory muscle strength and also some measures of lung function.

So give this a shot.

Let us know how it goes.

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
post
Filter by Categories
Abdomen
Accessory
ACL
Adductors
Ankle
Anti-Aging
Arch
Arm
Athleticism
Autonomic Nervous System
Axillary
Balance Training
Biceps
Blood Pressure
Breathing
Carpals
Cerebellum
Cervical
Clavicle
Coccyx
Cognition
Collar Bone
Common Peroneal
Company Update/Announcement
Concussion
Contraction
Coordination
Core
Costal Cartilage
Cranial Nerves
Depth Perception
Diaphragm
Dizziness
Ears
Education
Elbow
Endurance
Eyes
Facial
Fall Prevention
Feet
Femoral
Fingers
Forearm
Golf
Habit Change
Hamstrings
Hand
Hand Eye Coordination
Head
Hearing
Hip
Hip Labrum
Hypoglossal
Intercostal
Intestines
Isometric
Jaw
Knee
Lateral Femoral Cutaneous
Latissimus Dorsi (Lat)
LCL
Leg
Low Back
Lumbar
Mapping
MCL
Median
Meniscus
Metacarpals
metronome
Mid-Back
Mindfulness
Mobility
Mouth
Musculocutaneous
Nasal
Neck
Neurology
Nose
Nutrition
Obturator
Oculomotor
Optic
Pain Relief
Pelvic Floor
Pelvis
Performance
Peripheral Vision
Phalanges
Phrenic
Plantar Fascia
Popliteus
Posture
Power Generation
Quadriceps
Radial
Range of Motion
Reading/Research
Reflex
Rehab
Relaxation
Respiration
Ribs
Rotator Cuff
Sacroiliac
Sacrum
Saphenous
Scapula
Sciatic
Sensory
Shoulder
Shoulder Blade
Speed
Spinal Cord
Stability
Stamina
Stomach
Strength
Stretching
Suprascapular
Sural
Talus
Tarsals
Thoracic
Tibia
Tibial
TMJ
Toes
Tongue
Tractioning
Trap
Trapezius
Triceps
Trigeminal
Trochlear
Ulnar
Uncategorized
Vagus
Vertigo
Vestibular Training
Vestibulocochlear
Vision
Warm Up
Weight Loss
Wrist

Unlock 30 Days of Free Access to our exploratory course

0
Your Cart
Your cart is emptyReturn to Courses

Signup to receive the latest training resources

Also receive a free copy of our recommended reading list